Hungarian Grand Prix -Button Wins in 200th Race

What a fantastic way for Jenson Button to compete in his 200th F1 race. In a race with mixed conditions, Jenson Button was able to be consistent and make all of the right choices. Strategy was critical in this Hungarian Grand Prix, and Button didn’t put a foot wrong in his decisions.

Button shows great consistency to take 25 points in Hungary

Here is the order:

1. Jenson Button

2. Sebastian Vettel

3. Fernando Alonso

4. Lewis Hamilton

5. Mark Webber

6. Felipe Massa

7. Paul di Resta

8. Sebastian Buemi

9. Nico Rosberg

10. Jaime Alguersauri

11. Kamui Kobayashi

12. Vitaly Petrov

13. Rubens Barrichello

14. Adrian Sutil

15. Sergio Perez

16. Pastor Maldonado

17. Timo Glock

18. Daniel Ricciard0

19. Jerome d’Ambrosio

20. Tonio Liuzzi

Retirements included Schumacher with gearbox problems, the Lotuses of Jarno Trulli and Heikki Kovalainen, and Nick Heidfeld. Heidfeld’s Lotus Renault caught fire once again coming out of the pit lane, and a component within the car exploded dramatically, sending debris onto the track. One marshall was limping after the explosion, but thankfully nobody was seriously injured.

A dramatic fire puts Nick Heidfelt out of the race

Arguably, Hamilton should have won the race. He overtook Vettel soon after the start of the race, and built a large gap immediately. During the second half of the race, Hamilton spun at the chicane, and as he spun back around, he nearly collided with Paul di Resta and was given a drive-through penalty. Hamilton also went onto intermediate tires after “miscommunication on the radio.” A glitch meant that he could hear the pit, but the pit could not hear him. Soon after he went onto the intermediate tires, the rain stopped, meaning he had to come back into the pits once again. This left him in fifth position behind Webber, although he was ultimately able to regain fourth.

Hamilton could not convert his great pace into a victory

Webber also made the same decision to go onto intermediate tires, and had to do an unnecessary pit stop. This combined with a bad start meant that Webber could only manage 5th position at a track where he won last year.

Webber could not repeat his 2010 Hungary victory

What does this mean for the championship? Even though Vettel did not win, his championship lead is now larger than it has ever been this year. This is because his closest competitor in the championship is Mark Webber, who finished down in fifth position. It seems that no matter what the competitors do, Vettel seems to pull out a greater lead. His lead has only gone backwards twice in the championship, even though three other drivers have won races. Unfortunately for the other teams, Webber is acting almost as a buffer for Vettel. Webber is scoring solid results, and Vettel has finished in front of Webber at all races but one, but Webber is still second in the championship. This means that even when competitors beat Vettel, Vettel’s championship lead still extends.

Vettel opened up his championship lead to 85 points

However, we are about to reach a point when wins from drivers like Hamilton and Alonso will allow them to overtake Webber in the standings, and chew down on Vettel’s lead. Alonso has scored more points in the past four races than any other driver, and one can expect him to do so. His ability to perform strongly in every car he drives will be important as Ferrari try to match Red Bull’s performance.

Alonso has been scoring great points recently. A challenger for Vettel?

Hamilton is also looking strong, after running through the field in Silverstone to finish third, winning the German Grand Prix, and missing a victory that should have been his today in Hungary. They should now be confident and motivated to work hard over the break to keep their momentum. McLaren have won the last two races, so both Ferrari and Red Bull will be desperate to increase their pace over the break.

With 2 wins to his name, Hamilton could put a late-season charge on Vettel

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